Playwave Creative

REVIEW: A Girl In School Uniform (Walks into a Bar)

REVIEW: A Girl In School Uniform (Walks into a Bar)
Disasters can only be called coincidences so many times, before it’s just called neglect. ‘A Girl In School Uniform (Walks into a Bar)’, is set in the nearby future, but it’s more of a prediction of where we’ll be if we keep calling avoidable situations coincidences.

REVIEW: Sorry to cut you off, Penny

REVIEW: Sorry to cut you off, Penny
Someone once told me that there are a few conversation starter topics to avoid if you wanted to have a pleasant conversation with someone. These are; religion, finances, health, relationship issues and politics. Sorry to cut you off, Penny is all about politics.

FEATURE: Valuing Adventurous Work

FEATURE: Valuing Adventurous Work
When I tell people that I’m a theatre maker, a lot of the responses I get reference popular musicals, ask if I have seen the current spectacular playing at the Capitol Theatre or if I can hardly wait for the latest appropriation of Shakespeare in film. 

REVIEW: Lord of the Flies

REVIEW: Lord of the Flies
Taking an axe to the stage is Kip Williams’ rendition of ‘Lord of the Flies’ a twisted tale of survival and status. From William Golding’s novel we follow the lives of eleven school students who were being evacuated from WW2, when their plane crash landed on an island. With their school uniforms as identification they form friendships and a hierarchy that divide them into prey and the hunters.

REVIEW: Table for Two

REVIEW: Table for Two
Unpredictable, warm and charismatic. Table For Two ran for two nights to an intimate audience, closing the 2019 Bondi Feast Festival on an inspiring note.

INTERVIEW FEATURE: Skyduck: A Chinese Spy Comedy

INTERVIEW FEATURE: Skyduck: A Chinese Spy Comedy

Wang understands his audience and is making a play for himself and those around him. There’s a familiarity and complete lack of self-consciousness in the script and his overall performance. From puppets to musical numbers to high intensity one man action scenes, it really is a delight to watch the sheer imagination of Wang come to life.

Here's a peek into my chat with the creator of the play, Sam Wang. 

INTERVIEW: Nicole Pingon, Spider in my Soup

INTERVIEW: Nicole Pingon, Spider in my Soup

Nicole Pingon spins our heads with another captivating work. Spider in my Soup is driven by the quirky understanding that spiders are versions of ourselves from the future, looking back on our memories; either peacefully reliving it or wishing for a change in the outcome.

Performed at the Bondi Pavilion Gallery as a part of Bondi Feast, this work is deeply rooted in its connection to nature. Spiders linger in the corners of the room, spinning and weaving their webs and watching everyone. Strings are tied around the space, looping under chairs and wrapping around posts. Spider in my Soup follows the grounded childhood friendship of two girls, to their meandering adolescence.

Lara Franzi had a conversation with Director (and fellow Playwave Creative!) Nicole Pingon about the show and its evolution.

REVIEW: Once

REVIEW: Once
Once – though for some can be categorised as of a plaid-shirt’s simplicity – is a league on its own, depicting the human framework of fear against the unsure to trust our worth and happiness. This musical beautifies the mundanity with such rigorous heart and body that it speaks to the rawer side of life. All in all, Once ended on the peaks of fulfilment, the once-again eruption of ‘Falling Slowly’, when fear is morphed into something better, something beautiful. That’s art and the dwelling on music for us all. Out of this extraordinary experience, there was so much humanity to carve out, that I kept on rotating around this line in the musical ‘…because to live you have to love’. Since for once only, sure, to live better, to continue better – we have to love. Yes, to live, we have to love and love better.

REVIEW: The Happy Prince

REVIEW: The Happy Prince
Stephen Nicolazzo’s reimagining of Oscar Wilde’s tale of love between a golden statue and a curious swallow retains its classical routes whilst attempting to transport audiences into a lonely dreamscape.

SFF REVIEW: Her Smell

SFF REVIEW: Her Smell
At this point, no one could dispute Elizabeth Moss being one of the greatest actors working today; her roles in Madmen and The Handmaid’s Tale alone illustrate this point. In Her Smell, Moss cements her acting prowess as Rebecca Something: the leader of Something She; a fictitious world-renown punk-rock girl band who is far beyond her breaking point.

FEATURE: Theatre vs Film: Sharing the Story

FEATURE: Theatre vs Film: Sharing the Story

Here’s a question: What’s the biggest dividing difference between theatre and film?

My response was always: ‘The close ups’

Because of my love for detail, which I thought film was always best at showing. As cameras allow cinema to travel, to flow with the characters and to see insight into their lives that theatre stages cannot give...

 

REVIEW: Follow Me Home

REVIEW: Follow Me Home
Follow Me Home is a new work by Lewis Treston, created in association with ATYP and the Advocate for Children and Young People. Developed in consultation with over eighty young people who’ve experience homelessness in NSW, the work provides a unique insight into the varied ways homelessness may occur, and its impacts on the lives of young people.

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