Playwave Creative

FEATURE: Rime of the Ancient Mariner

FEATURE: Rime of the Ancient Mariner
As the premiere of their new devised take on Coleridge’s Rime of the Ancient Mariner at KXT approaches, Playwave Creative Brianna was lucky enough to be welcomed into their devising space to have a peek at where the Little Eggs Collective are at.

INTERVIEW FEATURE: Dead Cat Bounce

INTERVIEW FEATURE: Dead Cat Bounce
Dead Cat Bounce follows the story of Gabriel Freeman, an alcoholic writer in his late 40s, his new, younger girlfriend Matilda, his ex Angela and her new partner Tony. And Gabriel's cat, who they are still, for some reason, looking after. Carmella Winter spoke to the writer, Mary Rachel Brown about the show and the questions it arose for her.

REVIEW: How To Rule The World

REVIEW: How To Rule The World

From Parliament House to cocaine, dodge balls to dance sequences; Nakkiah Lui’s new political comedy, How to Rule the World, presents us with a melting pot of skit-like comedy, direct address, and musical elements, to create a colourful picture of Australia’s political climate today.

Political, satirical, and packed with big ideas, the show presents itself as a degustation menu, giving us a delicious taste of intersectionality, race, media sensationalism and the radical steps people are willing to take to have their opinions voiced.

INTERVIEW FEATURE: The Wolves

INTERVIEW FEATURE: The Wolves
Fun, high energy and relatable. Three (or so) words I would use to describe Sarah DeLappe’s 2017 Pulitzer Prize finalist play The Wolves. Having missed out on the debut season last year at the Old Fitz, when I was offered not only to attend the Belvoir St Theatre preview but to interview Nikita Waldron (player #46), I jumped at the chance (and up and down with joy).  

REVIEW: Sleep, Perchance to Dream

REVIEW: Sleep, Perchance to Dream

Sleep, Perchance to Dream is a whirlwind through the trapped mind of sweet Ophelia and her crumbled world. Central coast artist Alexandra Travers brings us this striking performance of rhythm and insanity. She throws us a twist to Shakespeare’s Ophelia, through her unique monologue and ideals that craft this new modern-day portrayal.

It is a wild and unchained performance that seems to grow in both meaning and necessity and still provides answers for our most troubled questions as our society continues to cycle around Shakespeare’s traditional morals.

REVIEW: Home

REVIEW: Home
Sitting in the audience of a show and feeling the house lights turn on as a cast member begins pacing the rows, preparing to choose someone to be dragged on stage is almost never a fun experience. But the audience members who ended up on stage during Home all instantly became just as much a part of the show as the performers, and it was incredibly entertaining to watch.

REVIEW: Two Hearts

REVIEW: Two Hearts
Two Hearts doesn’t take us inside a new world; it takes us down a forgotten road within our lives, to a party that’s not really our scene. It takes us into many new possibilities of relationships, with the people living beside us. We hear our own words in the actors’ mouths and feel the butterflies in our stomachs. It’s an honest romance that wants to survive.

REVIEW: Charlie Pilgrim

REVIEW: Charlie Pilgrim
Kids who crave a bit of adventure, come jump into an infinitive time loop with a couple of Charlies: another charming performance written by Sam O’Sullivan, who is paving his way through theatre and film by creating and acting. He lends us this quirky and crafty play for kids, which is a part of the ATYP (Australian Theatre for Young People) program involving young actors on stage. 

REVIEW: The Climbing Tree

REVIEW: The Climbing Tree
Last night I was taken to the regional city of Bathurst for the first time while watching The Climbing Tree at Riverside Theatres. It’s a place I haven’t much connection to except through mutual friends. I knew it to be cold during winter, busy during racing season and not much more. I left the show feeling like I understood the social climate of the place from a young person’s perspective, and in admiration of its rich history.

REVIEW: Yellow Yellow Sometimes Blue

REVIEW: Yellow Yellow Sometimes Blue
Yellow Yellow Sometimes BlueReviewed by Brianna McCarthy Last night I was able to see Q Theatre’s new work Yellow Yellow Sometimes Blue, an aromat...

POEM: Forever & Ever

POEM: Forever & Ever
Recently, our Playwave Creative Quang Mai went to see Forever & Ever by Sydney Dance Company. He wrote a poem structured on the stories that he personally got from this double bill featureing Rafael Bonachela’s award-winning Frame of Mind and a brand new work by internationally acclaimed choreographer Antony Hamilton called Forever & Ever.

FEATURE: Liveworks Festival of Experimental Art

FEATURE: Liveworks Festival of Experimental Art
Okay look, I get it. Experimental art can be… challenging. Personally I love the stuff, but who hasn’t looked at something deemed “experimental” and just thought… what?

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