Playwave Creative

INTERVIEW: Nicole Pingon, Spider in my Soup

INTERVIEW: Nicole Pingon, Spider in my Soup

Nicole Pingon spins our heads with another captivating work. Spider in my Soup is driven by the quirky understanding that spiders are versions of ourselves from the future, looking back on our memories; either peacefully reliving it or wishing for a change in the outcome.

Performed at the Bondi Pavilion Gallery as a part of Bondi Feast, this work is deeply rooted in its connection to nature. Spiders linger in the corners of the room, spinning and weaving their webs and watching everyone. Strings are tied around the space, looping under chairs and wrapping around posts. Spider in my Soup follows the grounded childhood friendship of two girls, to their meandering adolescence.

Lara Franzi had a conversation with Director (and fellow Playwave Creative!) Nicole Pingon about the show and its evolution.

REVIEW: Once

REVIEW: Once
Once – though for some can be categorised as of a plaid-shirt’s simplicity – is a league on its own, depicting the human framework of fear against the unsure to trust our worth and happiness. This musical beautifies the mundanity with such rigorous heart and body that it speaks to the rawer side of life. All in all, Once ended on the peaks of fulfilment, the once-again eruption of ‘Falling Slowly’, when fear is morphed into something better, something beautiful. That’s art and the dwelling on music for us all. Out of this extraordinary experience, there was so much humanity to carve out, that I kept on rotating around this line in the musical ‘…because to live you have to love’. Since for once only, sure, to live better, to continue better – we have to love. Yes, to live, we have to love and love better.

REVIEW: The Happy Prince

REVIEW: The Happy Prince
Stephen Nicolazzo’s reimagining of Oscar Wilde’s tale of love between a golden statue and a curious swallow retains its classical routes whilst attempting to transport audiences into a lonely dreamscape.

SFF REVIEW: Her Smell

SFF REVIEW: Her Smell
At this point, no one could dispute Elizabeth Moss being one of the greatest actors working today; her roles in Madmen and The Handmaid’s Tale alone illustrate this point. In Her Smell, Moss cements her acting prowess as Rebecca Something: the leader of Something She; a fictitious world-renown punk-rock girl band who is far beyond her breaking point.

FEATURE: Theatre vs Film: Sharing the Story

FEATURE: Theatre vs Film: Sharing the Story

Here’s a question: What’s the biggest dividing difference between theatre and film?

My response was always: ‘The close ups’

Because of my love for detail, which I thought film was always best at showing. As cameras allow cinema to travel, to flow with the characters and to see insight into their lives that theatre stages cannot give...

 

REVIEW: Follow Me Home

REVIEW: Follow Me Home
Follow Me Home is a new work by Lewis Treston, created in association with ATYP and the Advocate for Children and Young People. Developed in consultation with over eighty young people who’ve experience homelessness in NSW, the work provides a unique insight into the varied ways homelessness may occur, and its impacts on the lives of young people.

REVIEW: Blood On The Cat's Neck

REVIEW: Blood On The Cat's Neck

Washed in the sorrows of nine morally corrupted characters, this 1971 German play embeds the fears of drunken misfits who share their concern towards issues that are much too familiar to the ones we all still face today.  

Written by Rainer Werner Fassbinder and picked up by  Blood On The Cat’s Neck challenges the way we observe both theatre as well as otDirector Saro Luxty-Cavallari,hers, and invites us to be voyeurs into the characters' tragic wins and failures. Entering a bar scene, the audience steps into and onto stage to become part of a set that would seem empty without them. This interactive element is a powerful decision that lets us determine where to stand as we are witness to the torments on display.

HIGHLIGHTS OF SYDNEY FILM FESTIVAL 2019 FROM PLAYWAVE CREATIVES

HIGHLIGHTS OF SYDNEY FILM FESTIVAL 2019 FROM PLAYWAVE CREATIVES
Here at Playwave we are big fans of Sydney Film Festival. But with a chock-a-block program over twelve days, it's hard to know what to see. Our Playwave Creatives have taken the time to sift through the ocean of gems to pick out their diamonds in this year's program. Check out their highlights!

REVIEW: Small Mouth Sounds

REVIEW: Small Mouth Sounds
Small Mouth Sounds is a witty comedy, executed with life and enthusiasm. The story takes place in a meditation retreat, and when our six participants take a vow of silence, they have to survive the next few days without the most human means of communication: words.

REVIEW / INTERVIEW FEATURE: Extinction of the Learned Response

REVIEW / INTERVIEW FEATURE: Extinction of the Learned Response

A grind of thoughts and feelings that characterise before our eyes, Emme Hoy’s Extinction of a Learned Response is a new work showing as part of the 25A Belvoir independent season, filling the stage with an eerie glimpse into a dystopian nihilistic future.

After seeing the performance, Lara was lucky enough to interview playwright Emme Hoy on her motivation and meanings behind Extinction of a Learned Response.

INTERVIEW FEATURE: Alice in Slasherland

INTERVIEW FEATURE: Alice in Slasherland

Hell. Demons. A senior prom night in danger. Vietnamese American playwright, Qui Nguyen’s Alice in Slasherland is outrageous, unapologetic and currently playing at the Old Fitz for Sydney audiences.

I was lucky enough to catch not one, not two, but SIX of the cast from Alice in Slasherland, before they jumped into their tech run. Welcomed into the space with warm arms, this charming group of young creatives were all in good spirits.

REVIEW: The Australian Ballet's VERVE - Dress Rehearsal

REVIEW: The Australian Ballet's VERVE - Dress Rehearsal
The Australian Ballet presents a contrasting compilation of three uniquely striking performances. Verve is vigour, spirit and enthusiasm; Constant VariantsAurum, and Filigree and Shadow. Between these three distinctly different dances we are circulated through the most extreme and subtle emotional ventures. Invited by Playwave's newest partners, The Friends of the Australian Ballet, I was given the exclusive opportunity to watch their intimate dress rehearsals.

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